Here you will find current external funding opportunities available for innovation and research projects.

If you are aware of funding oportunities that are not listed please email the detail to stees.ideas@nhs.net and they will be added to the website.

 

18/56 Neurodegenerative Disorders

The Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation Programme is accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream.

Deadline: Tuesday 21st August 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

18/55 Improving Safety and Efficacy Through Targeted Drug Delivery

The Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation Programme is accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream.

Deadline: Tuesday 21st August 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/58 Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation Programme - Researcher Led

The Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation Programme is accepting stage 1 applications to their researcher-led workstream:

18/58 Researcher-led (including complex health and care needs in older people and brain tumour highlight notices)

Deadline: Tuesday 21st August 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

18/57 Type 2 Diabetes

The Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation Programme is accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream.

Deadline: Tuesday 21st August 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

SME support to evaluate innovative medical technologies: round 2

The Office for Life Sciences (OLS) is partnering with Innovate UK, as part of UK Research and Innovation, to invest up to £1.5 million. This is to support developers of innovative medicines, medical devices, diagnostics and regulated digital technology to evaluate their product in a real world clinical setting.

This competition aims to provide support for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). We are looking for an evidence base that can evaluate products that address NHS priorities. Our support will allow companies to collect and analyse clinical performance and cost effectiveness data in an NHS setting. 

There are 2 options for applicants in this competition:

  1. Study planning and preparation. Project costs up to £50,000
  2. Collection of clinical performance and cost-effectiveness data study. Project costs up to £250,000

All projects must be business led.

Projects can be collaborative but this is not mandatory. Only the lead partner can claim grant.

Find out if your business fits the EU definition of an SME.

If your project’s total costs or duration fall outside our eligibility criteria, email us at support@innovateuk.gov.uk at least 10 days before the competition closes.

Deadline: Wednesday 22nd August 2018 at 1200hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

SBRI: antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in humans

This is a Small Business Research Initiative (SBRI) competition to address antimicrobial resistance (AMR)

The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) will invest up to £10 million in 2 simultaneous competition strands.

Strand 1 projects must explore the scientific and technical feasibility of innovative solutions through proof of concept studies. They must focus on infection prevention and the development of new therapies and vaccines in relation to AMR. 

Strand 2 projects should be technically more advanced and can include:

  • proof of concept in a model system
  • progression of a technical evaluation to the point of readiness for clinical testing
  • demonstration of effectiveness in humans, patients or the relevant environment

Deadline: Wednesday 22nd August 2018 at 1200hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

SBRI: Improving Outcomes in Musculoskeletal Disorders

A new national Small Business Research Initiative (SBRI) Healthcare competition is being launched by NHS England in partnership with the Academic Health Science Networks (AHSNs) to find innovative new products and services. The projects will be selected primarily on their potential value to the health service and on the improved outcomes delivered for patients.

The competition is open to single companies or organisations from the private, public and third sectors, including charities. The competition runs in two phases (subject to availability of budget in 2019):

  • Phase 1 is intended to show the technical feasibility of the proposed concept. The development contracts placed will be for a maximum of 6 months and up to £100,000 (inc. VAT) per project

  • Phase 2 contracts are intended to develop and evaluate prototypes or demonstration units from the more promising technologies in Phase 1. Only those projects that have completed Phase 1 successfully will be eligible for Phase 2.

Developments will be 100% funded and suppliers for each project will be selected by an open competition process and retain the intellectual property rights (IPR) generated from the project, with certain rights of use retained by the NHS.

Deadline: Wednesday 22nd August 2018 at 1200hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

SBRI: Dentistry, Oral health and Oral Cancers

A new national Small Business Research Initiative (SBRI) Healthcare competition is being launched by NHS England in partnership with the Academic Health Science Networks (AHSNs) to find innovative new products and services.

The projects will be selected primarily on their potential value to the health service and on the improved outcomes delivered for patients. The competition is open to single companies or organisations from the private, public and third sectors, including charities. The competition runs in two phases (subject to availability of budget in 2019):

  • Phase 1 is intended to show the technical feasibility of the proposed concept. The development contracts placed will be for a maximum of 6 months and up to £100,000 (inc. VAT) per project
  • Phase 2 contracts are intended to develop and evaluate prototypes or demonstration units from the more promising technologies in Phase 1. Only those projects that have completed Phase 1 successfully will be eligible for Phase 2.

Developments will be 100% funded and suppliers for each project will be selected by an open competition process and retain the intellectual property rights (IPR) generated from the project, with certain rights of use retained by the NHS.

Deadline: Wednesday 22nd August 2018 at 1200hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

Innovation loans: July 2018 open competition

Innovate UK is to offer up to £10 million in loans to micro, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Loans are for highly innovative late stage projects with the best game changing and/or disruptive ideas or concepts. There should be a clear route to commercialisation and economic impact.

Projects should aim to develop new products, processes or services (or innovative use of existing ones) believed to be significantly ahead of anything similar in the field.

Your proposal can come from any technology (including arts, design, media or creative industries) and any part of the economy.

Projects must focus on commercialisation, growth or scale up. Priority is given to proposals likely to lead to growth, gains in productivity and/or access to new overseas markets through export.

Projects should last up to 5 years, of which up to 3 years can focus on late stage research and development (R&D), and up to 2 more years on establishing a clear route to commercial success. Loan repayments will be required over a further period of up to 5 years.

Businesses must be able to show that they:

  • can cover interest payments
  • will be able to repay the loan on time
  • need public funding

Deadline: Wednesday 29th August 2018 at 1200hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/66 Health Technology Assessment Programme researcher-led (primary research)

The Health Technology Assessment Programme is accepting stage 1 applications to their researcher-led workstream, 18/66 - Researcher-led primary research (including brain tumours, and complex health and care needs in older people highlight notices)

Deadline: Wednesday 29th August 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/65 Health Technology Assessment Programme researcher-led (evidence synthesis)

The Health Technology Assessment Programme is accepting evidence synthesis stage 1 applications to their researcher-led workstream, 17/148 - Researcher-led evidence synthesis (including brain tumours, and complex health and care needs in older people highlight notices)

Deadline: Wednesday 29th August 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

Improving lives of those with coeliac disease

Coeliac UK and Innovate UK are to invest £750,000 in a joint competition to find ways of improving the lives of people with coeliac disease.

Coeliac disease is an autoimmune disease caused by a reaction to gluten. Symptoms include diarrhoea, constipation, vomiting, stomach cramps, mouth ulcers, fatigue and anaemia. One in 100 people have the condition.

Gluten is found in wheat, rye and barley. Sources in diets can include breads, pastas, flours, cereals, cakes, and biscuits. It is used as an ingredient in other popular foods including fish fingers, sausages, gravies, sauces and soy sauce.

This competition - which includes a £500,000 contribution from Innovate UK and £250,000 from Coeliac UK - is part of a larger campaign to mark the 50th anniversary of Coeliac UK this year and raise £5 million for research into the disease.

The competition is seeking ideas in Coeliac UK’s 3 priority areas:

  • improve the diagnosis of coeliac disease, including alternative methods of diagnosis that do not involve ingestion of gluten, and tests that are less invasive than endoscopy and biopsy
  • develop better gluten-free food, including novel ingredients, foods with improved nutrients and flavour, new methods of preservation, and technologies to lower manufacturing costs and improve shelf-life
  • help people to self-manage their condition through digitally-supported health care

Funding is available for feasibility studies, industrial research and experimental development.

Deadline: Monday 3rd September 2018 at 0900hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

Business Basics: boosting SME productivity (trial strand)

The government announced the Business Basics Programme in its Industrial Strategy. The programme will test innovative ways of encouraging micro, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to adopt existing technologies and business practices that can boost their productivity. In doing so the programme aims to add to the evidence base of what works in driving up SME productivity.

The funding will be used to develop and trial ideas for increasing the adoption of productivity-boosting technology and business practices among SMEs. It will also be used to evaluate the effectiveness of these ideas in the short, medium and long term.

This is the first phase of the Business Basics Fund. This strand of funding is for undertaking full scale trials. At the same time we are running another strand for proof of concept (PoC) projects.

There is the potential for successful trials to apply for further funding to scale up in the future.

Collaborations are encouraged. Private organisations must work with at least one public sector or not for profit partner.

If your project’s total costs or duration fall outside of our eligibility criteria, contact us at least 10 days before the competition closes.

Deadline: Tuesday 4th September 2018 at 1200hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

Business Basics: boosting SME productivity (proof of concept strand)

The government announced the Business Basics Programme in its Industrial Strategy. The programme will test innovative ways of encouraging micro, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to adopt existing technologies and business practices that can boost their productivity. In doing so the programme aims to add to the evidence base of what works in driving up SME productivity.

The funding will be used to develop and trial ideas for increasing the adoption of productivity-boosting technology and business practices among SMEs. It will also be used to evaluate the effectiveness of these ideas in the short, medium and long term.

This is the first phase of the Business Basics Fund. This strand of funding is for undertaking proof of concept (PoC) or feasibility projects. At the same time we are running another strand for full scale trials.

There is the potential to apply for further funding to scale up successful PoC or feasibility projects into full trials in the future.

Collaborations are encouraged. Private organisations must work with at least one public sector or not for profit partner.

If your project’s total costs or duration fall outside of our eligibility criteria, contact us at least 10 days before the competition closes.

Deadline: Tuesday 4th September 2018 at 1200hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/74 Health Services and Delivery Research Programme researcher-led (evidence synthesis)

The Health Services and Delivery Research (HS&DR) Programme is accepting stage 2 evidence synthesis applications to their researcher-led workstream.

Deadline: Thursday 6th September 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/73 Health Services and Delivery Research Programme researcher-led (standard)

The Health Services and Delivery Research (HS&DR) Programme are accepting stage 1 applications to their researcher-led workstream.

Deadline: Thursday 6th September 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

Open grant funding competition: round 2

Innovate UK, as part of UK Research and Innovation, will invest up to £20 million in the best cutting-edge or disruptive ideas or concepts with a view to commercialisation.

All proposals must be business focused (rather than pure research). Applications can come from any area of technology, science or engineering, including arts, design, media or creative industries, and be applied to any part of the economy.

Proposals can fit into, or be outside of, one or more of the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund areas.

Where appropriate, we will share application details with other potential public sector co-funders.

All projects must start by 1 March 2019.

Deadline: Wednesday 12th September 2018 at 1200hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/91 Rural Health and Care Workforce

The Health Services and Delivery Research (HS&DR) Programme are accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream.

Deadline: Thursday 13th September 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/90 Integrated Mental Health and Physical Health and Care Services for health economies

The Health Services and Delivery Research (HS&DR) Programme are accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream.

Deadline: Thursday 13th September 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/92 Evaluating approaches to health and care services commissioning and provision with the third sector in the UK

The Health Services and Delivery Research (HS&DR) Programme are accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream.

Deadline: Thursday 13th September 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

EUREKA Eurostars 2, round 10

Small businesses working on high-quality research and development (R&D) projects across national borders often find it difficult to attract public-sector funding. EUREKA Eurostars was set up to overcome this barrier to innovation. With its market-led approach, it encourages international collaborative research and innovation projects that will be rapidly commercialised.

Eurostars supports SMEs in leading international collaborative research and innovation projects by helping them get access to guidance and funding.

A Eurostars project must have a civilian purpose and be aimed at the development of a new product, process or service.

Projects must be led by a research-performing SME.

Please note that the competition deadline is 13 September 8:00pm Brussels time.

Deadline: Thursday 13th September 2018 at 1900hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/52 Management of isolated or incidental subsegmental pulmonary embolism

The Health Technology Assessment Programme is accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream for this primary research topic.

Deadline: Wednesday 19th September 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/44 Pre Hospital Pain Management

The Health Technology Assessment Programme is accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream for this primary research topic.

Deadline: Wednesday 19th September 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/40 Short-term use of benzodiazepines for the acute management of acute low back pain

The Health Technology Assessment Programme is accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream for this primary research topic.

Deadline: Wednesday 19th September 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/39 Earlier active management of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

The Health Technology Assessment Programme is accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream for this primary research topic.

Deadline: Wednesday 19th September 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/43 Rotation of the fetal head at full cervical dilatation

The Health Technology Assessment Programme is accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream for this primary research topic.

Deadline: Wednesday 19th September 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/41 Clinical and cost effectiveness of alternative urinary catheter design

The Health Technology Assessment Programme is accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream for this primary research topic.

Deadline: Wednesday 19th September 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

Investment accelerator: innovation in precision medicine

This is an investment accelerator competition providing simultaneous grant funding and private investment for early stage projects led by UK companies.

Up to £6 million of grant funding and a comparable amount of private equity investment is available to support business-led innovation in precision medicine technologies. Proposals must offer a disruptive change to the way that we accurately diagnose, monitor and treat disease.

The competition is open to single SMEs who are looking for grant funding and who want to establish an equity relationship with a UK venture capital firm. Find out if your business fits the EU definition of an SME.

We are particularly encouraging new deal flow from the investor partners. SMEs who already have investment from one or more of the investors are also eligible. Preference may be given to first time investments in the event of a large number of high quality applications.

Deadline: Wednesday 26th September 2018 at 1200hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/42 Cystic Fibrosis

The Health Technology Assessment Programme is accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream for this primary research topic.

Deadline: Wednesday 26th September 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/47 Outpatient cervical ripening for induction of labour

The Health Technology Assessment Programme is accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream for this primary research topic.

Deadline: Wednesday 26th September 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/46 Pharmacological management of post-traumatic seizures

The Health Technology Assessment Programme is accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream for this primary research topic.

Deadline: Wednesday 26th September 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/48 Radiotherapy in first-line treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

The Health Technology Assessment Programme is accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream for this primary research topic.

Deadline: Wednesday 26th September 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/49 Radiofrequency denervation for low back pain

The Health Technology Assessment Programme is accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream for this primary research topic.

Deadline: Wednesday 26th September 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/51 Extended duration haemodialysis

The Health Technology Assessment Programme is accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream for this primary research topic.

Deadline: Wednesday 26th September 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/45 Proton pump inhibitor therapy for refractory gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms

The Health Technology Assessment Programme is accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream for this primary research topic.

Deadline: Wednesday 26th September 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

H2020: Understanding causative mechanisms in co- and multi-morbidities - SC1-BHC-01-2019

Specific ChallengeThe increasing number of individuals with co-and multimorbidities poses an urgent need to improve management of patients with multiple co-existing diseases. A better understanding of their causative mechanisms is needed to develop early diagnosis, efficient prevention and monitoring, and better treatments adapted to co- and multimorbid patients throughout their life course. Furthermore, there are many different etiological models of comorbid conditions (e.g., direct causation model or a consequence of treatment). In this context, capturing and measuring patient's complexity in the context of co- and multimorbidities is crucial for adequate management of these conditions and requires innovative approaches.

ScopeProposals should identify and validate causative mechanisms (e.g. molecular, genetic, correlative, drug-drug interaction) combining mental and physical disorders through the integration of basic, pre-clinical and/or clinical research. Applicants should prove the relevance of the identified mechanisms for co-morbid development. Where pertinent, development of biomarkers and other technologies for diagnosis and monitoring of comorbid conditions in patients is encouraged. A purposeful exploitation of existing data, biobanks, registries and cohorts is expected, but does not exclude generation of new data. Sex and gender aspects, age, socio-economic, lifestyle and behavioural factors and any other non-health related individual attributes should be taken into consideration. SME participation is strongly encouraged.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 4 and 6 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

  • New directions for clinical research to improve prevention, diagnosis, prognosis, therapy development, and management of co- and multimorbidities.
  • Whenever relevant identified biomarkers for more accurate and earlier diagnosis, prognosis as well as monitoring of patients' condition.

Cross-cutting PrioritiesSocio-economic science and humanities and Gender

  • Clinical trials are excluded
  • Including any national, EU or international resource or infrastructure if appropriate.

Deadline: Tuesday 2nd October at 1700 hrs (CET)

Further information can be found here.

 

H2020: Stratified host-directed approaches to improve prevention, treatment and/or cure of infectious diseases- SC1-BHC-14-2019

Specific Challenge: Despite major advances in development of new drugs and vaccines against infectious diseases, many of the therapies and preventive measures do not result in the expected favourable health outcomes for various reasons. The pathogen might be resistant to the treatment, or a required immune response might not be provoked to contain the infection; the used drug might not reach the pathogen, or the pathogen might escape the host defence mechanisms. In addition, each individual might be responding differently to the intervention, making it difficult to make one intervention fit all patients. A promising avenue to overcome treatment failure in infectious diseases is to develop novel therapeutic or preventive approaches on the basis of specific factors identified in the host or the host-pathogen interaction. This approach provides the basis for stratification of individuals based on these characteristics and tailor the treatment or the preventive measure accordingly.

ScopeProposals should test emerging concepts in drug and/or vaccine development in order to address the problem of antimicrobial drug resistance and to optimize therapeutic, curative or preventive measures against infectious diseases of major concern for Europe. Proposals should capitalize on knowledge of the role of host factors, immune-modulators or of host-pathogen interactions influencing disease outcome that can be utilized to strengthen the response to treatment or prevention measures. This should lead to new enhanced therapies, cures and/or preventive measures. Differences in factors such as age, gender and genetic variation among the human population should be taken into consideration.

The proposals should focus on late pre-clinical and/or clinical research, supporting proof of concept and selecting relevant biomarkers for clinical validation. They should take advantage of existing or newly established cohorts to help identify factors for predicting the course of the disease and its response to the intervention in stratified patients.

The downstream constraints for the uptake of the intervention by national health systems should be taken into account. The suitability, acceptability and adaptability of the interventions to be developed should be addressed and assessed for different population groups and will thus require expertise from the social sciences and the humanities.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 6 and 10 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

  • Increase Europe's capacity to control infectious diseases.

  • Enriched product development pipelines with novel, potentially more effective, targeted treatments, cures and/or preventive measures for infectious diseases and/or validated biomarkers with potential for rapid uptake into clinical practice.

  • Reduced burden of major infectious diseases.

  • Contribute to the achievement of the European One Health Action Plan against Antimicrobial Resistance.

  • Contribute to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goal 3, ensure health and well-being for all, at every stage of life.

Deadline: Tuesday 2nd October 2018 at 1700 hrs (CET)

Further information can be found here.

H2020: Implementation research for Maternal and Child Health- SC1-BHC-19-2019

Specific Challenge:Each year, an estimated 213 million women become pregnant and 140 million newborn babies are delivered. However, many of the women and infants receive no appropriate care or care that is below evidence-based standards; others suffer from over-medicalisation. Access to quality care, during and after pregnancy, is essential to ensure good maternal health and the favourable early development of the child.

The gap between countries with the lowest and highest maternal mortality rates has doubled between 1990 and 2013 and huge differences exist within countries in Europe and globally. The burden of maternal mortality in both contexts falls disproportionately on the most vulnerable groups of women and girls: Every day approximately 830 women die from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth; 99% of maternal deaths occur in developing countries.

Although there is a consolidated evidence base of what works in improving maternal and newborn health, the "knowledge-do" gap has not been bridged and evidence based guidelines are insufficiently implemented or integrated in routine training and service provision. Therefore, more and better targeted implementation research is needed.

ScopeProposals should focus on implementation research for improving maternal and child health with a focus on the first '1000 days' from pregnancy until two years of age. This research can take place in either high income countries or low and middle income countries, or in a combination thereof.

The implementation research in the first 1000 days may cover:

  • new or improved health service delivery interventions that strengthen maternal and child health; and/or

  • the scaling up and/or adapting of existing evidence-based interventions to new contexts.

Neither pre-clinical research nor clinical trials in the context of product development are within the scope of this call.

The research should take into account the specificities of different contexts and situations. The research should be integrated from different perspectives, e.g. recognising the interdependent relationship between mother and child; addressing prevention, health promotion and treatment; allowing for the specific needs of vulnerable groups (e.g. preterm infants, adolescents, migrants); addressing different concurrent pathologies; avoiding the creation of parallel or vertical programmes, etc;. Research may cover physical and/or mental health, as well as communicable and non-communicable diseases. The integration of social sciences including gender analysis and the use of mixed methods research is strongly encouraged. In addition, particular attention should be given to equity issues.

The interventions should build on but may go beyond existing state-of-the art knowledge on biological, psychological and social determinants of maternal and child health. Research is expected to be carried out in continuous partnership, in particular with the end-users, i.e. the concerned women, the fathers, and their community, in addition to policy makers, politicians, and the media, to ensure that evidence can be translated into policy and practice.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting an EU contribution between EUR 2 to 4 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact

  • Research-supported solutions to maternal and child health challenges.

  • Providing evidence of successful and/or innovative approaches for bridging the ''knowledge-do'' gap in improving maternal and child health.

  • Better understanding of scaling-up processes with regard to different contexts and resource requirements.

  • Contribution to the achievement of SDGs 2 on improved nutrition (target 2), Goal 3 on health (targets 1 and 2 on maternal and child health) and Goal 5 on gender equality (targets 1 and 6) and Goal 10 (on reducing inequality within and between countries).

Deadline: Tuesday 2nd October 2018 at 1700 hrs (CET)

Further information can be found here.

 

H2020: Demonstration pilots for implementation of personalised medicine in healthcare- SC1-BHC-25-2019

Specific Challenge: Personalised medicine (PM) has the potential to respond to, among others, the increasing burden of co-morbidities and thus enhance the sustainability of healthcare systems. With the increasing number of scientific approaches available, it is crucial to demonstrate the benefit of large scale deployment of personalised medicine to citizens and healthcare systems. This was also one of the conclusions of the Personalised Medicine Conference 2016.

(http://ec.europa.eu/research/conferences/2016/permed2016/index.cfm).

Scope: The pilot projects should demonstrate the benefit for individuals as well as the implementability and economic viability of personalised medicine approaches in real life healthcare settings. The pilots should be tailored to the needs of citizens, making use of a wide variety of data and proposing prediction, prevention or treatment solutions, focussing on diseases with high burden to society (taking due account of sex/gender differences) and including multi-morbidity conditions if relevant. The use of big data approaches and high performance computing is encouraged. Applicants should ensure coordination with national, regional or local authorities engaging in healthcare environments and should aim at linking different institutions (hospitals, other healthcare facilities, public health authorities, payers etc.). The pilot projects should engage partners in regions or cities having adopted or that are in advanced planning for introducing PM approaches. Patient representatives as well as partners from countries that are in the process of upgrading their healthcare systems should be involved, ensuring a wide European dimension. Applicants should address the health economic, ethical, legal and societal aspects of the proposed action. Taking into account the advances already achieved for PM approaches in cancer and rare diseases, projects with primary focus on these diseases are excluded from the scope of this topic.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 18 and EUR 20 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact

  • Evidence for a PM-based model of care that can be used as a basis for the delivery of new ways of care organisation.

  • Demonstration of the viability and feasibility of PM approaches in real-life settings and at a large scale, exemplifying potential for savings in overall healthcare costs.

  • Widening of PM approaches to include diseases other than cancer and rare diseases.

  • Linking of different actors for healthcare, economy, lifestyle, healthy living and regulation, making use of the multitude of data available.

Deadline: Tuesday 2nd October 2018 at 1700hrs (CET)

Further information can be found here.

H2020: Systems approaches for the discovery of combinatorial therapies for complex disorders - SC1-BHC-02-2019

Specific Challenge: Many complex disorders pose a challenge to identify the most effective therapeutic interventions because current therapies often target specific aspects of a disease, without achieving complete control or the best possible results for patients. Due to the multiple causes of such diseases and the heterogeneity between patients, approaches directed at single targets have had limited efficacy, overlooking important factors involved in disease pathophysiology. Hence, a promising therapeutic approach to meet this challenge is to combine different therapies, while increasing therapeutic efficacy in a cost-effective manner.

Scope: Research should aim to understand at systems level the pathophysiology of a disorder in groups of patients responding well or poorly to particular therapies and further develop combinatorial therapies tailored to the needs of individuals or stratified patient groups.

Projects should focus on already available and/or authorised therapies and have access to standardized biobank samples derived from retrospective or currently running clinical studies. These patient samples should be re-analysed with modern high-throughput technologies. The existing and newly produced data should be integrated using systems approaches, which could combine sub-cellular/cellular and/or organ level in-silico models and network analysis as appropriate, and used to build more sophisticated computational frameworks to predict patient responses to combinatorial therapies. These predictions should be validated in pre-clinical and clinical studies taking into account sex and gender differences. Funding of late stage clinical trials is not within the scope of this topic.

Applicants should include a thorough data management plan for transnational data sharing to enable the computational analysis and it is strongly recommended to adhere to the state-of-the-art international standards and to the general concepts of the FAIR principles.

The topic invites proposals in complex disorders of high prevalence and of a high economic burden (rare diseases are excluded). SME participation is strongly encouraged.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 4 and 6 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

  • New concepts of combinatorial therapies for complex disorders tailored to the needs of individuals or stratified patient groups.
  • Improved efficacy and take-up in the clinical setting in comparison to established therapeutic interventions.
  • Enable the development of personalised medicine.
  • Increased research & innovation opportunities in this industry intensive field, particularly for SMEs.

Delegation Exception Footnote:

https://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/complex-diseases-research-and-applications-748

Deadline: Tuesday 2nd October at 1700 hrs (CET)

Further information can be found here.

 

Biomedical Catalyst 2018 round 2: Primer Award

Description - This is a competition for a primer award in the Biomedical Catalyst.

Biomedical Catalyst supports the development of innovative healthcare products, technologies and processes. These can include:

  • disease prevention and proactive management of health and chronic conditions
  • earlier or better detection and diagnosis of disease, leading to better patient outcomes
  • tailored treatments that either change the underlying disease or offer potential cures

Biomedical Catalyst has 4 types of funding award: feasibility, primer, early stage and late stage. The late stage award is running alongside this one. They are designed to help SMEs developing a product or process to provide an innovative solution to a health and care challenge. The scheme supports progression from initial concept through to late stage development.

We welcome applications from any sector or discipline.

If your project’s total costs or duration fall outside of our eligibility criteria,email us at least 10 days before the competition closes.

Funding type - Grant

Project size - We expect projects to range in size from £200,000 to £1.5 million (total project costs). Projects should last 12 to 36 months and must start before 1 April 2019.

Deadline: Wednesday 3rd October 2018 at 1200hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

Biomedical Catalyst 2018 round 2: late stage

Description - This is a competition for a late stage award in the Biomedical Catalyst.

Biomedical Catalyst supports the development of innovative healthcare products, technologies and processes. These can include: 

  • disease prevention and proactive management of health and chronic conditions
  • earlier or better detection and diagnosis of disease, leading to better patient outcomes
  • tailored treatments that either change the underlying disease or offer potential cures

Biomedical Catalyst has 4 types of funding award: feasibility, primer, early stage and late stage. The primer award is running alongside this one.

You should have prior credible research on your proposal, including a demonstration of validation in a relevant model system. We welcome applications from any sector or discipline.

If your project’s total costs or duration fall outside of our eligibility criteria, email us at least 10 days before the competition closes.

Funding type - Grant

Project size - We expect projects to range in size from £200,000 to £4 million (total project costs). Projects should last 12 to 36 months and must start before 1 July 2019.

Deadline: Wednesday 3rd October 2018 at 1200hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

Women in Innovation Award 2018

Innovate UK, as part of UK Research and Innovation, is looking for women who are rising stars in business innovation. Applicants must be confident, with the support of an award, that they can make a significant contribution to one of the Industrial Strategy Grand Challenges:

  • Artificial intelligence and data.
  • Ageing society.
  • Clean growth.
  • Future of mobility.

We are offering 8 Women in Innovation Awards. The winners will receive a £50,000 grant and a bespoke package of mentoring, coaching and business support.

The aim of this competition is to find women with exciting, innovative ideas and ambitious plans that will inspire others.

The competition is split into 2 phases. In phase 1 the written application will be assessed by independent experts. In phase 2 the shortlisted applicants will be interviewed by a panel of experts.

The awards are for female founders, co-founders or senior decision makers working in companies that have been operating for at least one year.

Deadline: Wednesday 3rd October 2018 at 1200hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/80 Precision Medicine (HTA Programme)

The Health Technology Assessment Programme is accepting stage 1 applications for this primary research topic.

Deadline: Tuesday 6th November 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

18/89 Digital technologies to improve health and care

A call for empirical research studies to evaluate the use of digital technologies to improve health outcomes, self-management of health or delivery of health and social care. Some examples of relevant technologies are highlighted through the link below, however, evaluation of any type of intervention with a clear digital component are included under the call. The purpose of this call is to evaluate existing digital technologies and their potential to bring benefit to health and social care – the development of digital interventions is outside of the remit of this call. Applicants should justify the importance of their proposed research and identify how the work supports aspirations to improve health outcomes, enable individuals to better manage their own health, extend or support the roles of health and social care staff, improve the delivery of health and social care services or reduce health inequalities. Consideration must also be given to timely delivery and future relevance of findings and the effect of digital technologies on health inequalities.

Deadline: Tuesday 6th November 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/85 End of Life Care (EME Programme)

A call for applied health research studies to increase the evidence base to support health and care services to help people at the end of their lives to live as well as possible and to die with dignity, compassion and comfort. The scope for research includes the impact on patients, families, carers, workforce, as well as an evaluation of the burden on and uncertainties within the health and social care system. We welcome research proposals for end of life care in any disease, service or setting, including hospitals, specialist centres and services, community services and care homes. For the purposes of this call ‘end of life care’ involves identifying and caring for “people who are likely to die within 12 months”, including those with advanced, progressive, incurable conditions and people with life-threatening acute conditions that are expected to result in early death. It covers care provided in any health and social care setting, for both adults and infants, children and young people. It also embraces support for families and carers. Given the scope of this call, we would welcome applications that span the remit of one or more of the participating research programmes (EME, HTA, HS&DR and PHR) and which comprise of co-ordinated teams of investigators spanning different specialties/disciplines and geographical centres.

Deadline: Tuesday 6th November 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/86 Precision Medicine (EME Programme)

The Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation Programme is accepting stage 1 applications for this primary research topic.

Deadline: Tuesday 6th November 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/82 End of Life Care (HS&DR Programme)

The Health Services and Delivery Research (HS&DR) Programme are accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream.

Deadline: Tuesday 6th November 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/83 Precision Medicine (HS&DR Programme)

The Health Services and Delivery Research (HS&DR) Programme are accepting stage 1 applications to their commissioned workstream.

Deadline: Tuesday 6th November 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/84 End of Life Care (PHR Programme)

The Public Health Research Programme are accepting stage 1 applications for this primary research topic.

Deadline: Tuesday 6th November 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

 

NIHR 18/81 End of Life Care (HTA Programme)

The Health Technology Assessment Programme is accepting stage 1 applications for this primary research topic.

Deadline: Tuesday 6th November 2018 at 1300hrs

Further information can be found here.

H2020: Regenerative medicine: from new insights to new applications - SC1-BHC-07-2019

Specific Challenge: Regenerative medicine offers hope for untreatable disease and the ageing population, improved quality of life and reduced medical costs. However, so far, regenerative medicine has not yet proved itself in the clinic beyond rare diseases or conditions of limited public health importance. With recent scientific discoveries opening up new approaches to regenerative medicine, the challenge is to use these to extend the regenerative approach to major diseases and conditions.

ScopeRegenerative medicine replaces or regenerates human cells, tissue or organs, to restore or establish normal function. Projects should focus on innovative translational research to develop regenerative processes towards the ultimate clinical goal of addressing unmet clinical needs of large patient groups. Proposals should be based on new approaches such as genome editing or gene therapy, transdifferentiation or in vivo reprogramming, cell therapy and transplantation, 3D bioprinting, organoids or use of combined products (non-exhaustive list for illustrative purposes only). In all cases, proposals should explain in what way their approach is regenerative. Research on improved methods of tissue and organ transplantation is included on the condition that there is a clear regenerative step in the process. The project may focus on any step(s) on the innovation chain, from early testing and characterization of regenerative mechanisms to preclinical research, proof of concept or clinical trial. Sex and gender differences should be investigated, where relevant. Projects should include a section on the proposed therapy's exploitation potential, regulatory and commercialisation strategy and how it would be made available and delivered to patients.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 6 and 8 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact

  • Potential new regenerative therapies to address unmet clinical needs of large patient groups identified
  • Europe's position in translational regenerative medicine strengthened
  • New therapies for major human diseases and conditions, and new approaches for therapy taken further in the development pipeline.

Deadline: Tuesday 16th April 2019 at 1700 hrs (CET)

Further information can be found here.

H2020: Innovation Procurement: Next generation sequencing (NGS) for routine diagnosis - SC1-BHC-10-2019

Specific Challenge: We observe a progressive shift in routine diagnostics, and more particularly in personalised medicine practice, from a growing number of molecular tests to a next generation sequencing approach (NGS). NGS can provide insights on a person’s genetic susceptibility to disease, diagnostic information, and predictive indications about treatment outcome. It also allows to embrace simultaneously different molecular pathways of disease evolution and to identify actionable mutations in a patient for medical decision and further research. In addition, it requires less sample material than multiple tests and therefore reduces risk and inconvenience for patients. However, the introduction of NGS in clinical practice is hampered by its cost, the availability of proper NGS tests, and diagnostic errors resulting from insufficient quality assurance, technological bias and complex interpretation of data.

Scope: The objective is to implement NGS in routine diagnostics for personalised medicine and scale up demand-driven innovation for healthcare systems. This includes organisational, economical, technical and clinical aspects. It should lead to NGS tests, clinically validated procedures (including sex analysis), quality assurance schemes, tools and methods for data collection, management, analysis and interpretation, with a view to assist clinical decision-making and foster medical research and innovation. Transferability and cloud based NGS data analyses should be considered, as appropriate. Input from initiatives like the EJP Cofund on rare diseases and ERNs should be considered when relevant. Ethical issues should be addressed.

For grants awarded under this topic for Pre-Commercial procurement it is expected that results could contribute to European or international standards. Therefore, the respective option of Article 28.2 of the Model Grant Agreement will be applied.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 9 and 11 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Proposals of this topic should follow the specific requirements for pre-commercial procurement PCP supported by Horizon 2020 grants as set out in General Annex E of the WP.

Expected Impact:

  • New NGS platforms and use of NGS tests in routine diagnostics for personalised medicine.
  • Accepted new European standards and quality assurance schemes with respect to NGS.
  • Strengthening of implementation of personalised medicine and improved clinical decisions and health outcomes for the benefits of patients.
  • Contribution to the sustainability of healthcare systems.
  • Growth and benefit to the European industry, in particular SMEs.

Deadline: Tuesday 16 April 2019 at 1700 hrs (CET)

Further information can be found here.

 

H2020: Large Scale pilots of personalised & outcome based integrated care - SC1-DTH-11-2019

Specific Challenge: Senior people are statistically at greater risk of cognitive impairment, frailty and multiple chronic health conditions with consequences for their independence, their quality of life (and the one of their families) but also for the sustainability of health and social care systems. There is also increasing evidence that interactions with the environment play an important role in the evolution of the patient's health status and condition. The challenge is now to foster secure, scalable and robust digital solutions for integrated care which will:

  • Ensure a truly personalized delivery of health and social care, whilst supporting outcomes-based significant efficiency gains in health and care delivery.
  • Promote a shift towards outcome-based delivery of integrated (health and social) care, which can be realised in a realistic operational, organisational and financial setting.
  • Ensure trust of users and policy makers with regard to data access, protection and sharing.
  • Design flexible but replicable solutions with a potential for financial sustainability, large scale deployment and further business and job creation opportunities.

Scope: The scope of this topic is to foster the large-scale pilots for deployment of trusted and personalised digital solutions dealing with Integrated Care, with a view to supporting and extending healthy and independent living for older individuals who are facing permanently or temporarily reduced functionality and capabilities. This in turn is expected to contribute to a patient-centred and truly individualized strategy in order to develop trusted, robust and financially sustainable services potentially useable in any Member States and the Digital Single Market, and applicable to a very wide range of patient pathways. These approaches aim to enable people to remain independent as long as possible and prevent hospitalisation.

Expected outcomes are in priority:

  • Efficiency gains in terms of resource utilization and coordination of care.
  • Flexibility and replicability of service delivery patterns to combine personalization and large scale adoption of services with patient and citizen feedback.
  • Ensuring secure and efficient sharing and processing of all data and information involved in the supply chain at each step of data stream: access, protection, sharing, processing and storage.
  • Improvement of quality of life for the patient and his/her family and also of working conditions of all health care and social care providers involved in the supply chain, taking into account multi-disciplinary environment and constraints. Working conditions of professionals should cover in priority: work time management, quality of data/information exchange and multi-disciplinary coordination.

Outcome indicators should contribute to the assessment of the action regarding trust, recruitment, added value for the patient (in terms of quality of life) and cost-efficiency altogether.

  • Recruitment of professionals will be measured by the number of professionals registered as actual used compared with the number of professionals actually registered in the pilot site region.
  • Quality of life should be measured on the basis of commonly used questionnaires (like SF36) but also if required on the basis of specific disease-oriented measurement tools.
  • Measurement of cost-efficiency should be measured on the basis of work time information dedicated to each patient.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 4 and 6 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

Proposals should provide measurable progress towards:

  • A common vision of technical prerequisites and framework to ensure users trust with regard to health and social data and information in IT supported environment, in line with existing EU data protection regulation (and if required with EU reflection on platforms).

  • An evidence-based minimum data set on key points of the pathway: Harmonisation, certification, approval labelling or reliable identification of adequate solutions for integrated care.
    • Clerical information: complete definition

    • Clinical information: generic definition.

  • Robust and reliable and replicable business models for IT supported solutions in a truly personalized and multi-disciplinary environment.

Deadline: Wednesday 24 April 2019 at 1700 hrs (CET)

Further information can be found here.

H2020: The Human Exposome Project: a toolbox for assessing and addressing the impact of environment on health - SC1-BHC-28-2019

Specific ChallengeDespite the general acknowledgement by the scientific community that 'Genetics load the gun but environment pulls the trigger'' when it comes to the causation of major non-communicable diseases (NCDs)there is persistent uncertainty as to the global burden of disease attributable to environmental (including life-style and climatic) factors, including healthcare costs and negative economic impact. Deciphering the human exposome is a novel way of addressing the challenge to improve health and reduce the overall burden of disease. This will require improved knowledge of health risks, including combinations of several risk factors, and the mechanisms by which they affect health at different stages throughout the life course, including exposures in foetal life. Effective preventive action will need to be designed, building on knowledge of various risk factors, including exposure to pollutants in daily life, individual behaviour and the social context, taking into account gender issues.

Developing a Human Exposome Project would present a fundamental shift in looking at health, by moving research away from ‘one exposure, one disease’ understanding to a more complex picture upon which to build solid, cost-effective preventive actions and policies in the future. It would respond to the need for more complete and accurate individual-level exposure data in order to estimate the largely unknown environmental component of NCDs.

ScopeApplicants should take advantage of the last decade's rapid technological advances which have opened up new opportunities to collect, combine and analyse large data sets offering new possibilities to understand the contribution of environmental factors to the global health burden of common chronic diseases. Proposals should use innovative approaches to the systematic and agnostic identification of the most important environmental risk factors for the development of major NCDs across the life course (including in utero), leading to preventive interventions at the individual, group or population level and contribute to sustainable healthcare. Well-designed retrospective epidemiological studies may be included and proposals may envisage the creation of a prospective Europe-wide exposomics cohort and biobank, integrating behavioural, socio-economic factors and clinical records.

The following components should be considered: agnostic evaluation of the role of multiple and unknown exposures; assessment of individual exposure to multiple stressors; sensors that combine external exposure and health data measurements; integration of external exposome data with cross-omics responses and (epi)genetic data; systematic evaluation and simulations of the health impacts; socio-economic modelling and econometric analysis including ethical and sex/gender aspects where relevant; better data mining tools, including advanced statistical analysis of complex data and high-performance/high throughput computing and storage; a long-term host and a single shared data infrastructure, taking into account existing structures and ensuring open access to data generated.

Innovation and connections with industry are expected in the areas of sensor development (external exposome), omics technology and novel biomarker development (internal exposome), bioinformatics, and data processing and management. Proposals are expected to respond to a persistent or long-standing policy/regulatory need where the exposome approach would be useful to solve a scientific issue to underpin better regulation now or in the future (examples: indoor and outdoor air quality, waste, occupational health, noise).

In order to establish an overarching Human Exposome Project, an overall coordination mechanism between the projects funded will be required and will be added at the grant preparation stage to all selected proposals as a common work package. Grants awarded under this topic will be complementary. The respective options of Article 2, Article 31.6 and Article 41.4 of the Model Grant Agreement will be applied.

The Commission considers that a proposal requesting an EU contribution between EUR 8 to 12 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

  • Innovation in environmental health sciences, in particular for external and internal exposure assessments and data management.

  • Enabling researchers and policy makers to continuously include new knowledge in the policy making processes by using the toolbox to generate data and information.

  • Better prediction of disease risk by acquisition of new knowledge on the influence of external exposures on biological pathways at different life-stages and identification of early signs of health damage caused by environmental factors.

Deadline: Tuesday 16 April 2019 at 1700 hrs (CET)

Further information can be found here.

H2020: Mining big data for early detection of infectious disease threats driven by climate change and other factors - SC1-BHC-13-2019

Specific Challenge:

A range of factors is responsible for the (re-)emergence of infectious disease threats, including antimicrobial resistance, altering the epidemiology and spread of disease in a changing global environment. These include drivers such as climate change and associated environmental impacts, population growth, unplanned urbanisation and high mobility, as well as animal husbandry or intensive farming practices.

At the same time, tools for infectious disease diagnostics and surveillance are evolving rapidly, allowing for ever more accurate diagnosis in ever shorter time. The use of next generation sequencing combined with surveillance data, health registries and societal data from informal/non-traditional sources (e.g. social media) holds promise for improving individual and population health. Current advanced IT technologies offer the opportunity to integrate such big data sets and could enable the rapid and personalised treatment of infected patients, and bolster the detection, tracking and control of infectious disease outbreaks.

ScopeIt is expected that proposals develop:

  1. the technology to allow the pooling, access, analysis and sharing of relevant data, including next generation sequencing;

  2. the innovative bio-informatics and modelling methodologies that enable risk modelling and mapping; and

  3. the analytical tools for early warning, risk assessment and monitoring of (re-)emerging infectious disease threats.

Proposals should be able to demonstrate the feasibility of such extended data mining for the purposes outlined above, as well as its European level added value. The ready-to-use analytical tools and services that are developed should be based on an assessment of the needs of potential end-users in the Member States and on European level, should as far as possible build on and be compatible with existing European initiatives, and should remain available for public use at the end of the project at a reasonable cost.

Proposals should be transdisciplinary and ensure an integrated One Health approach by linking data from a wide range of relevant sources depending on the infectious disease threat. These may include human (e.g. community, hospital or laboratory health services) and animal health surveillance, health registries, microbial and viral genomic data (including next generation sequencing), pathogen resistance data, mapping of vectors, climate and environmental data as well as societal data that are correlates of disease; possible sex and/or gender differences should be taken into account. Solutions for gaps in existing data (addressing both a lack in quality and quantity) should be proposed.

Solutions for interoperability between different data sources should be addressed and integrated. It is expected that quality-controlled data are shared in accordance to the general concepts of the FAIR principles. The use of harmonised protocols in collaboration with other actors is recommended for this purpose. Appropriate regulatory and governance mechanisms need to be foreseen, taking into account different data sharing needs, as well as data privacy and data security aspects for the different types of stakeholders providing and analysing data. The technology and tools developed should be functional outside of outbreaks (i.e. in "peace time"), so that all stakeholders involved develop a routine use of them. At the same time, flexibility is needed to enable adaptation to different outbreak contexts and situations. The proposal shall foresee, in case of public health emergencies, open access to data at the moment it is generated or no later than one month thereafter subject to any safeguards required to protect research participants and patients, in accordance with the relevant options in Article 29.3 of the Model Grant Agreement.

The use of advanced IT technologies like high performance computing, or geo-localisation data are anticipated. The use of European health research (e-)infrastructures such as those included under CORBEL is encouraged where relevant. The successful proposal(s) should foresee to consult with the end-users at both national (e.g. public health institutes) and European (e.g. ECDC, EFSA) level at key milestones of the project's timeline. If more than one proposal is selected, they are expected to collaborate. In addition, coordination will be needed with the selected proposal from the Horizon 2020 call topic SFS-36-2017 on the establishment of a European Joint Programme on One Health.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 12-15 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact

  • Strengthened EU preparedness to address threats from (re-)emerging infectious disease threats, by making available the appropriate technology and tools for risk modelling and early threat detection, to support an appropriate public health response.

  • Contribution to the European One Health action plan against antimicrobial resistance.

  • Contribution to the digital transformation of health and care within the context of the EU Digital Single Market.

  • Contribution to achieving Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 3 and specifically the targets on 1) combating epidemics, and 2) strengthening capacity for early warning and response to health risks.

  • Contribution to achieving of SDG 13 and specifically the targets on 1) integrating climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning, and 2) improving education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change adaptation, impact reduction and early warning.

Deadline: Tuesday 16th April 2019 at 1700 hrs (CET)

Further information can be found here.

 

H2020: SC1-DTH-05-2019 Large scale implementation of digital innovation for health and care in an ageing society

Specific Challenge: An ageing population is increasing demand-side pressures on public health and social care providers across Europe. These pressures undermine the long-term sustainability of existing models for delivering care services to the ageing population.

The challenge is to scale up outcome-based innovative digital health and care solutions across EU borders through joining up actions in procurement of innovation. Digital health and social care solutions have been tested and have demonstrated success in smaller scale settings. However, despite cooperation initiatives amongst regions through INTERREG programmes [1]or the transfer of innovation schemes of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA)[2], large-scale deployment of digital health and care solutions across EU borders remains limited. There is a lack of collaborative efforts in public purchasing of innovative ICT-based solutions for active and healthy ageing and successfully engaging demand and supply sides in scaling up innovation. This is the case in particular for digital solutions integrating health, social or community care and informal care, IoT enabled independent living solutions[3] that allow the citizens to live safely and independently at home therefore avoiding institutionalisation, or tele-care solutions and tools supporting for self-care and person-centred care. Moreover, take-up of these ICT-based solutions by both public care providers as well as people in need for care is a crucial factor in successfully alleviating the demand-side pressures on public health and care provision. Supporting the public procurement of innovation helps public authorities by aggregating demand and sharing the inherent risks associated to deploying new innovative solutions that can be integrated with existing public health and care provision systems.

Scope: This topic will contribute to the Digital Single Market Strategy priorities on digital transformation of health and care (notably to the priority on user-centred integrated care), to the Scaling-Up Strategy[4] of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) and will support the EIP on AHA Reference Sites contribution to the Digital Single Market Strategy, notably the priority focusing on user-centred integrated care. The actions supported will target large-scale deployment of digital health and care solutions across different regions in Europe. In line with the priority actions of the EIP on AHA Scaling-up Strategy, the scope of this PPI is to specify, purchase and deploy ICT based solutions (made up of services and ICT products to enable the provision of services) for active and healthy ageing through a common supply and demand side dialogue, which can deliver sustainable, new or improved health and care services promoting patient feedback in which public procurement approaches for innovative solutions lead to improved outcomes. Proposals should:

  • Be driven by clearly identified procurement needs[5] of the participating organisations and building on a deep understanding of the needs of the ageing population, as well as the needs of the relevant health and care providers;
  • Support sustainable deployment of new or improved person-centred and outcome-based services promoting patient feedback by providers involved in the procurement of solutions for digital health and care providers, including networking of inpatient and outpatient care, nursing services and care homes;
  • Contribute to the creation of scalable markets across Europe in innovative solutions for active and healthy ageing;
  • Specify measures that will ensure the sustainability of solutions beyond the lifespan of the proposed project, notably taking into account levels of acceptance with users and professionals as well as health economics considerations.
  • Engage public and/or private procurers from each country participating (at national, regional or local level) that have responsibilities and budget control in the relevant area of care or supply of services;
  • Be based on a complete set of common specifications for end to end services;
  • Demonstrate that the implementation phase will reach "large scale" (i.e. sufficient scale to achieve statistical significance) through region-wide deployment across multiple regions of Europe;
  • Contribute to the use of interoperable solutions based on open platforms and take into account existing best practices and standardisation initiatives;
  • Provide robust safeguards to ensure compliance with ethical standards and privacy protections and take account of the gender dimension;
  • Contribute with good outcome-based practices that are impact measured according to the MAFEIP[6] methodology and can be made available for replication across other regions (e.g. "detailed plans" for larger scale sustainable uptake of innovative solutions for active and healthy ageing, reference material and guidelines, manuals and education materials) through the EIP on AHA innovative practices repository.
  • Contribute to the development of national strategies to stimulate the procurement of digital innovation for health and care services based on the outcomes achieved at national level.

The European Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 2 and 5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately through PPI. This does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Proposals of this topic should follow the specific requirements for innovation procurement PPI supported by Horizon 2020 grants as set out in General Annex E of the WP.

Expected impact:The proposal should provide appropriate indicators to measure its progress and specific impact in the following areas:

  • Growing awareness and successful use of public procurement to boost ICT innovation applied to integrated care and active and healthy ageing, implemented across the whole chain of care ultimately benefiting the growing ageing population across Europe;
  • Contribution with data and experiences to regulatory and legislative process development addressing potential barriers to procurement of innovative solutions for active and healthy ageing;
  • Contribution of an open and comprehensive socio-economic evidence base for ICT investments in the field that can support the development of sustainable business models (e.g. cost-benefit analysis, increased efficiency of health and care systems, impact assessments, return on investments, quality of life improvements for users, ethics, safety gain and user satisfaction);
  • Support initiatives on interoperability and standardisation that can contribute to defragmentation of the market for ICT based active and healthy ageing solutions;
  • Creation of economic boundary conditions that can support long-term sustainability of health and care systems and emergence of new business models to develop ICT innovation for active and healthy ageing in Europe;
  • Support forward-looking, concerted public-sector investment strategies that benefit from joint approaches across different regions;
  • Create new opportunities for market uptake and economies of scale for the supply side for ICT based solutions and services for active and healthy ageing in a Digital Single Market for Europe.
  • Contribute to inform policy measures that foster the take-up of ICT solutions for active and healthy ageing.

Deadline: Wednesday 24 April 2019 at 1700 hrs (CET)

Further information can be found here.

 

H2020: SC1-DTH-01-2019: Big data and Artificial Intelligence for monitoring health status and quality of life after the cancer treatment

Specific Challenge: Currently available methods and strategies for diagnosis and treatment of cancer help clinicians continuously improve quality of care and prevent cancer deaths in the population. Accurate risk assessment, availability of genetic tests, timely diagnosis and effective treatment has created the impression of cancer being a chronic disease that can be cured. However, often rather aggressive treatment, psychological stress (anxiety and depression) can cause physical and psychological problems that may cause long-term after-cure consequences such as similar or other types of cancer, other types of (chronic) diseases and affect the quality of life of a patient. Therefore, the importance of addressing and, if possible, preventing long-term effects of cancer treatment is growing. In addition to patient-reported outcomes such as functional status, symptoms intensity and frequency, multiple domains of well-being and overall satisfaction with life, the use of big data can bring valuable information for monitoring health status and quality of life after the cancer treatment. Big Data can provide new opportunities to define statistical and clinical significance, but present also challenges as it requires specific analytical approaches.

Scope: Proposals should focus and deliver on how to better acquire, manage, share, model, process and exploit big data using, if appropriate, high performance computing to effectively monitor health status of individual patients, provide overall actionable insights at the point of care and improve quality of life after the cancer treatment. Relevant solutions include for example systems for determining and monitoring (taking also in account gender differences) the combined effects of cancer treatment, environment, lifestyle and genetics on the quality of life, enabling early identification of effects that can cause development of new medical conditions and/or impair the quality of life. Proposals preferably address relevant health economic issues, use patient reported outcome and experience measures (PROMs and PREMs) and take into account the relevant social aspects of health status and quality of life after cancer treatment. Integrated solutions should include suitable approaches towards security and privacy issues.

Information can be collected from traditional sources of health data (cohorts, comprehensive electronic health records or clinical registries, incl. genetic data, validated biomarkers for remission), from new sources of health data (mobile health apps and wearables) and from sources that are usually created for other purposes such as environmental data.

It is important to assure ethical aspects of data, confidentiality, and anonymity of data transfer and engagement of those who collect / code such data in its analysis and interpretation, in order to avoid misinterpretation and inappropriate conclusions by using proper annotation methodologies of the data. Involvement of those who work within healthcare systems, patients, family and relatives, and the general public is needed.

 

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 3 and 5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. Participation of SMEs is encouraged.

Expected Impact: The proposal should provide appropriate indicators to measure its progress and specific impact in the following areas:

  • Mapped comprehensive big data in a reachable and manageable way by applying principles for sharing and reusability, creating a network of knowledge by linking translation tools, heterogeneous data sources and biomedical texts for monitoring health status and quality of life after the cancer treatment;
  • Emerging data driven analytics and advanced simulation methods to study causal mechanisms and improve forecasts of ill-health, identification of disease trajectories and relapse;
  • Better and faster means of high quality response to prevent or timely address development of new medical conditions and/or improve the quality of life;
  • Better knowledge for improved patient counselling as well as to improve follow-up of patients;
  • Novel information on health maintenance, onset and course of medical conditions with a view to optimise prevention and treatment;
  • Evidence base for the development of policy strategies for prevention, early diagnosis, therapies as well as addressing health inequalities, support to patient registries at national level;
  • Improved quality of life after cancer treatment, strengthening personal confidence and enhancing employability;
  • Preventative strategies are established which have a real effect of reducing the occurrence of health disorders and co-morbidities associated with cancer treatment.

Deadline: Wednesday 24th April 2019 at 1700 hrs (CET)

Further information can be found here.

Wellcome Trust - Innovator Award

Up to £500,000 available for up to 24 months to support researchers who are transforming great ideas into healthcare innovations that could have a significant impact on human health. The current focus areas are mental health, neurological disorders and neglected tropical diseases (although applications from other areas may be considered).

Deadline: Ongoing

Further information can be found here.

NESTA - Impact Investment Fund

The Fund invests between £150k and £1m in social ventures developing innovations that tackle the major challenges faced by older people, children and communities in the UK. An experienced team of sector experts, venture capitalists, impact investors and evaluators backed by Nesta, provide expertise and guidance, helping companies to grow their reach, demonstrate their impact and become financially sustainable.

Deadline: Ongoing

Further information can be found here.